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Family Studies and Human Development: Graduate Programs

Overview: 

The Family Studies and Human Development program offers a  Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) with an emphasis in FSHD.  The FSHD graduate curriculum is designed to provide broad exposure to developmental, interpersonal, and family theories, to develop research skills and expertise, and to build in-depth knowledge in a content area chosen by the student.  The doctoral program trains social and behavioral scientists for research, teaching, and other professional careers in academic, government, and private-sector settings.

Expected Learning Outcomes: 

Graduate Program Expected Student Learning Outcomes and Assessment Plan

Upon completing a graduate degree in Family Studies and Human Development students will demonstrate:

1. Demonstrate strong knowledge of research methods and their application as evidenced in the effective design, critique, and/or conduct of empirical research studies.     

2. Demonstrate strong knowledge of analytical (e.g., statistical) procedures and their application as evidenced in appropriate analysis of empirical data.

3. Be able to describe, critically evaluate, and apply multiple theoretical perspectives within family studies and human development as evidenced in written work and oral presentations (e.g., assignments, research proposals, manuscripts).

4. Demonstrate knowledge of current and cutting-edge research in area of specialization within family studies and human development as evidenced in written work and oral presentations (e.g., assignments, research proposals, manuscripts).

5. Be able to communicate effectively in-person or “live” to a variety of audiences (e.g., students, scholars).

6. Be able to communicate effectively in writing as evidenced in written assignments, manuscripts, etc.

     

    Assessment Activities: 

    Recurring or Regular Activities

    The Online Graduate Program Assessment was developed by the FSHD Graduate Curriculum Committee with input from FSHD faculty.  Faculty serving as major advisors/committee chairs, complete the Comprehensive Exam, Master's Thesis, and Dissertation Assessment forms following a student's completion of each activity.  Course instructors for FSHD 507B, 537B, 546, and 567 complete the course-based assessments based on each student's performance in meeting course requirements relevant to the student outcome areas.

    Special or Occasional Activities

    • Alumni Follow-up: The alumni follow-up is facilitated by members of the FSHD Graduate Committee in order to gather a personal assessment of our graduate program efforts.  Alumni provide their feedback anonymously via an online interview in the following areas:  (a) contact information, current occupation, and recent accomplishments; (b) their experiences as a graduate student (e.g., course quality and coverage, research training, professional/career development, mentoring, financial support, teaching experience); (c) ratings (4-point likert scale) of their preparation with respect to each of the six expected student learning outcomes.
    Assessment Findings: 

    Faculty Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes - Fall 2012-Spring 2015

    Alumni Online Interview:  Eleven alumni who completed the FSHD doctoral program between Fall 2012 and Spring 2015 were contacted and asked to complete the Alumni Online Interview Form.  Eight alumni provided provided contact information, and six provided open-ended comments on their experiences as a graduate student and rated the six expected student learning outcomes.

    Change in Response to Findings: 

    Results of both direct (faculty-assessed/course-based) and indirect (Online Alumni Survey) assessments indicate a high level of student success in meeting expected learning outcomes.  Over the period from fall 2012 to spring 2015, faculty rated student performance to be moderately strong with respect to all six learning outcomes.  Results of the Online Alumni Survey parallel the direct assessment findings, with respondents giving moderately strong ratings of their preparation in each of the six outcomes areas.  Overall, the findings are very satisfactory and do not indicate a need for further changes at this time.

    Updated date: Tue, 05/24/2016 - 09:19