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Teaching & Teacher Education: Graduate Programs

Overview: 

The Department of Teaching and Teacher Education provides graduate programs at both the masters and doctoral levels with emphases in the following areas: teacher knowledge, teacher reflection, teacher beliefs, learning to teach, critical education and theory, philosophy and education, classroom processes, curriculum development, environmental education, teacher education in STEM fields, Early Childhood Education and education of Mexican Amercian populations. We attract linguistically, geographically, and ethnically diverse and highly qualified students to our undergraduate, master’s, and doctoral programs. Our website (http://www.ed.arizona.edu.) contains more information on our programs.

Teach Arizona is a one-year master’s degree certification program for people who have earned a bachelor’s degree and want to become middle or high school teachers. Upon completion of the program, students earn a Master of Education Degree in Teaching and Teacher Education and are eligible for Arizona secondary teacher certification (grades 6-12). Courses are linked to the Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) Standards and National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers (NETS-T).

Teach Arizona follows a cohort model. Students take the majority of their courseowork together with the exception being the specific content area methods courses designed for their area of specialization. Students begin coursework in May during summer pre-session and end the program at the end of spring semester the following May.

The Teach Arizona program of study includes:

  • EDP 558 Educational Testing and Measurement (3 units)
  • EDP 510 Learning Theory in Education (3 units)
  • LRC 535 Content Area Literacy in a Multicultural School (3 units)
  • LRC 516 Structured English Immersion Foundations (3 units)
  • SERP 596c Instruction in Special Learning Needs (3 units)
  • TTE 593a Field Experience (6 units)
  • TTE 536 Alternative in the Secondary Classroom (3 units)
  • One Content Area Methods Course: TTE 523, 524, 526, 527 or 540 (3 units)
  • TTE 597r Action Research Workshop (3 units)
  • TTE 593b Student Teaching (6 units)
  • TTE 539 Recent Research on Teaching and Schooling (3 units)
  • LRC 517 Structured English Immersion Methods (3 units)

TTE offers the Doctor of Philosophy  (Ph.D.)  in Teaching and Teacher Education.  Students have options for specializations in the Ph.D. including Early Childhood Education, Environmental Education, Mathematics Education, Science Education, Teaching Mexican American Children, and Equity and Social Justice in Education.  The Ph.D. offers advanced study for graduate students interested in careers in educational research and practice as faculty in universities and other educational instutitions.  Students develop knowledge of appropriate research methodology in education and practical experience in conducting research  studies through coursework and research practica.

 

 

Expected Learning Outcomes: 

Type: Master's Degrees 

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Teaching Expertise

  • Students will develop expertise in the areas of teaching processes, teacher education, and/or general curriculum or advanced knowledge of a specific subject area of curriculum (e.g. social studies, mathematics, science, language arts, etc.).
  • Students will develop understanding of the underpinnings of and the inquiry possibilities related to their practice as classroom teachers, curriculum specialists, or program supervisors.

 Research Expertise

  • Students develop knowledge of appropriate research methodology in education and practical experience in conducting research studies through coursework and research practica.

 Teach Arizona (M.Ed.) Program

The Teach Arizona teacher preparation program is accredited by the Arizona Department of Education, with the following Learning Outcomes.

InTASC Standards
InTASC #1:  Learner Development
. The teacher understands how learners grow and develop, and designs and implements developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.
InTASC #2:  Learning Differences. The teacher uses understanding of individual differences and diverse cultures and communities to ensure inclusive learning environments that enable each learner to meet high standards.
InTASC #3:  Learning Environments. The teacher works with others to create environments that support individual and collaborative learning, and that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self motivation.
InTASC #4:  Content Knowledge. The teacher understands the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and structures of the discipline(s) he or she teaches and creates learning experiences that make the discipline accessible and meaningful for learners to assure mastery of the content.
InTASC #5:  Application of Content. The teacher understands how to connect concepts and use differing perspectives to engage learners in critical thinking, creativity, and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues.
InTASC #6:  Assessment. The teacher understands and uses multiple methods of assessment to engage learners in their own growth, to monitor learner progress, and to guide the teacher’s and learner’s decision making.
InTASC #7:  Planning for Instruction. The teacher plans instruction that supports every student in meeting rigorous learning goals.
InTASC #8:  Instructional Strategies. The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage learners to develop deep understanding of content areas and their connections, and to build skills to apply knowledge in meaningful ways.
InTASC #9:  Professional Learning and Ethical Practice. The teacher engages in ongoing professional learning, uses evidence to continually evaluate his/her practice, and adapts her/his practice to meet the needs of each learner.
InTASC #10:  Leadership and Collaboration. The teacher seeks appropriate leadership roles and opportunities to take responsibility for student learning, collaborate with others to ensure learner growth, and advance the profession.
 

NETS-T
NETS-T #1:  Facilitate and Inspire Student Learning and Creativity. The teacher uses her/his knowledge of subject matter, teaching and learning, and technology to facilitate experiences that advance student learning, creativity, and innovation in both face-to-face and virtual environments.
NETS-T #2:  Design and Develop Digital-Age Learning Experiences and Assessments. The teacher designs, develops, and evaluates authentic learning experiences and assessments incorporating contemporary tools and resources to maximize content learning in context and to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes identified in the NETS-S (NETS for Students).
NETS-T #3:  Model Digital-Age Work and Learning. The teacher exhibits knowledge, skills, and work processes representative of an innovative professional in a global and digital society.
NETS-T #4:  Promote and Model Digital Citizenship and Responsibility. The teacher understands local and global societal issues and responsibilities in an evolving digital culture and exhibits legal and ethical behavior in his/her professional practice.
NETS-T #5:  Engage in Professional Growth and Leadership. The teacher continuously improves her/his professional practice, models lifelong learning, and exhibits leadership in his/her school and professional community by promoting and demonstrating the effective use of digital tools and resources.

 

Type: Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Advanced knowledge of curriculum and appropriate research methodology in education:

Doctoral Degree TTE offers the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree for advanced graduate students interested in careers in educational research and practice.Students develop knowledge of appropriate research methodology in education and practical experience in conducting research related studies through coursework and research practica.

Students have options for specializations in the Ph.D. including Early Childhood Education, Environmental Education, Mathematics Education, Science Education, Teaching Mexican American Children, and Equity and Social Justice in Education.  The Ph.D. offers advanced study for graduate students interested in careers in educational research and practice as faculty in universities and other educational instutitions.  Students develop knowledge of appropriate research methodology in education and practical experience in conducting research studies through coursework and research practica. 

  • Students develop knowledge of appropriate research methodology in education and practical experience in conducting research studies through coursework, practica, and dissertation work. 
  • Students develop advanced knowledge of general curriculum theory, instruction and curriculum issues in specific areas (e.g. mathematics, science, multicultural education, etc.) and teacher education for inquiry and advancement of knowledge in one or more of these areas.
  • Students develop knowledge and skills to teach courses in their area of expertise through internship and teaching assistant experiences.
Assessment Activities: 

Assessment Activities for the M.A. Degree:

Annual Faculty Progress Assessment.  For the last three years, TTE graduate faculty have met as a group to discuss the progress of each student in the graduate programs.  Each faculty advisor reports on progress of advisees in completing coursework, research projects, and exit options for Master’s students.  The faculty as a whole evaluates satisfactory progress using TTE guidelines for satisfactory progress and makes recommendations for each student.  Faculty advisors then follow up on any suggestions for advising students.  See Appendix for TTE Graduate Student Guidelines for Satisfactory Progress.

Building on information from the Office of Instructional Assessment we have identified a number of possible indicators to measure graduate student outcomes in Teaching and Teacher Education as specified on the department website.  In the table below, the outcomes are the column headers and the possible indicators are the rows.  We have marked with X whether an indicator could provide information regarding a given outcome. 

Assessment Activities Outcome 1 Outcome 2 Outcome 3

 

 

Students develop knowledge of appropriate research methodology in education and practical experience in conducting research related studies

      

 

 

Students develop advanced knowledge of general curriculum theory, instruction and curriculum issues in specific areas (e.g. mathematics, science, social studies, multicultural education, etc.) and teacher education for inquiry and advancement of knowledge in one or more of these areas.

Students develop knowledge and skills to teach courses in their area of expertise.

 

Specific assignments in identified courses (e.g.,EDP541 or equivalent for quantitative methods; LRC/HED 605 Qualitative Methods)

X

Xa

 

EXIT OPTIONS

To be developed  

To be developed  

To be developed  

Master’s Thesis

                      x

X

 

Portfolio

x

X

x

Research Paper

x

X

 

Written Exam

x

X

x

Action Research Project

x

X

 

a Relevant course work might be TTE 545 Curriculum Theory and other courses from relevant specializations

Assessment Rubric

Assessment Activity:  TTE faculty have not used a consistent rubric for evaluating progress of students in the master’s programs and the current effort to develop outcomes assessment is a work in progress.  Faculty who teach in the graduate programs are currently involved in discussions of revisions to the graduate program requirements, content, along with discussion of outcomes assessments.  The chart above is a first attempt to evaluate master’s work consistently and will be revised after pilot assessments and faculty training to calibrate scores so that scoring is consistent across faculty.

Assessment Activities would include coursework (exams, portfolios, teaching and research projects) and whatever exit option students select (Master’s Thesis, Portfolio, Research Paper, Written Exam, Action Research Projects) using the following rubric.  The following is a suggestion for evaluating the research component of the selected exit option.

Research study (Selected option______________) 

Date: _______________________________ Faculty member __________________

Directions: Evaluate this student’s written research reports with a score between 1 (needs improvement) and 5 (excellent) for each of the criteria described below. Below each score and statement, briefly comment on the rationale if your score is less than 5. 

Score (1 – 5)

___ The research has a conceptual framework. 

____The research report is well written. 

____ The problem is clearly described with adequate critical analysis of the related literature. 

____ The research design for studying the problem is adequate. 

____ The data are adequately analyzed. 

____ The conclusions drawn from the analysis are well defended and consistent with the presented evidence.  

____ The student demonstrates the ability to extrapolate his/her research to broader implications in the field.

Assuming faculty are assigning scores consistently, we would be able to represent information from this form in table format:

Criterion

Average Score for Year  1

(dissertations: n = 5)

Average Score for Year 2

(dissertations: n = 6)

Clearly stated problem

2.8

3.5

Appropriate study design

3.7

1.2

….

 

 

….

 

 

 

Assessment Activities for the Teach Arizona M.Ed. Degree:

The learning outcomes are assessed through class activities and assignments embedded in the courses included in the Teach Arizona program of study. The following table identifies which courses address the different learning outcomes.

 

EDP 558

EDP 510

LRC 535

LRC 516

SERP 596c

TTE 593a

TTE 536

TTE 523

TTE 524

TTE 526

TTE 527

TTE 540

TTE 597r

TTE 593b

TTE 539

LRC 517

InTASC 1

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

 

x

x

x

InTASC 2

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

 

x

x

x

InTASC 3

x

x

x

 

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

 

x

x

x

InTASC 4

x

x

x

x

 

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

 

x

 

x

InTASC 5

x

x

x

x

x

x

 

x

x

x

x

x

 

x

 

x

InTASC 6

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

 

x

x

x

InTASC 7

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

 

x

x

x

InTASC 8

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

 

x

 

x

InTASC 9

x

x

 

 

x

x

x

 

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

 

InTASC 10

x

x

 

 

x

x

x

 

x

x

 

x

 

x

x

 

NETS-T 1

x

 

x

x

x

x

 

x

x

x

x

x

 

x

x

x

NETS-T 2

x

 

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

 

x

 

x

NETS-T 3

x

 

x

x

x

x

x

 

x

x

 

 

 

x

x

 

NETS-T 4

 

 

 

x

 

x

 

x

x

x

x

x

 

x

x

x

NETS-T 5

 

 

 

x

 

 

x

 

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

Students ability to meet the standards are formally assessed using "Benchmark Assignments." One such benchmark is the Student Teaching capstone experience. An evaluation instrument developed in partnership with all teacher preparation programs across the UA campus is used. A pdf copy of this instrument is attached.

Teach Arizona students are assessed by the University Supervisor, who completes the assessment in collaboration with the Student Teacher's Cooperating Teacher. University Supervisors receive training in the use of the assessment instrument in an attempt to achieve some level of inter-rater reliability.

 

Assessment Activites for Ph.D. Degree:

Annual Faculty Progress Assessment.  For the last three years, TTE graduate faculty have met as a group to discuss the progress of each student in the graduate programs.  Each faculty advisor reports on progress of advisees in completing coursework, research projects, and doctoral benchmarks for Ph.D. students (Qualifying Exam, Comprehensive Exams, Dissertation Proposal, Dissertation Defense).  The faculty as a whole evaluate satisfactory progress using TTE Graduate Student Guidelines for Satisfactory Progress and makes recommendations for each student.  Faculty advisors then follow up on any suggestions for advising students.  For example, letters from the Department to students who are not making satisfactory progress advising them of what they need to do in order to be in good standing.

Outcomes Assessment for Doctoral Students in TTE

Building on information from the Office of Instructional Assessment we have identified a number of possible indicators to measure graduate student outcomes in Teaching and Teacher Education as specified on the website.  In the table below, the outcomes are the column headers and the possible indicators are the rows.  We have marked with X whether an indicator could provide information regarding a given outcome. 

 

Assessment Activities Outcome 1 Outcome 2 Outcome 3

 

 

Students develop knowledgeof appropriate research methodology in education and practical experience in conducting research related studies.

 

 

 

 

Students develop advanced
knowledge of general curriculum theory, instruction and curriculum issues in specific areas (e.g. mathematics, science, social studies, multicultural education, etc.) and teacher education for inquiry and advancement of knowledge in one or more of these areas.

 

Students develop knowledge and skills to
teach courses in their area of expertise.

 

Specific assignments/projects in identified courses (e.g., EDP541 or equivalent for quantitative methods; LRC/HED 605 Qualitative Methods)

X

 

Xa

 

Supervisor’s evaluation of experience as RAs on grants and faculty led research (research apprenticeships)

X

 

 

Professional Presentations and Publications

X

X

 

Written Qualifying Exam

X

X

 

Written & Oral Comprehensive Exams

X

X

 

Proposal Defense

X

 

 

Written Dissertation & Oral Defense of the Dissertation

X

 

 

Teaching Assistantships

 

 

X

Teaching Internships

 

 

X

a Relevant course work might be TTE 545 Curriculum Theory and other courses from relevant specializations.

Faculty Assessment of Benchmarks in progress toward the degree.

Eventually TTE will develop rubrics to assess each benchmark in progress toward the degree.  However, we will begin by developing a rubric for two of these benchmarks, the Dissertation Proposal and Dissertation Defense.  This rubric will assess Outcome #1.  After piloting the rubric and calibrating scores across faculty, the faculty can develop rubrics for each of the other benchmarks (Qualifying Exam, Comprehensive Exams,).  Assess the quality of the dissertation & defense can be a useful tool for future use in revising the program, both for the dissertation proposal defense and the dissertation defense.  The purpose would be to collect information on the areas in which our students excel and to identify areas for improvement.  For example, if across dissertation studies, issues with research design were identified, we would know that we might want to review our methodological training requirements.  Conversely, if information across students indicated that dissertation topics were well defined and situated in the appropriate context, we would know that the program is doing a good job of developing students’ analytical thinking around educational issues.

To efficiently collect this information, the scheduling of any proposal defense or dissertation defense date should trigger an administrative action to send out the form below to all committee members along with the other forms required by the Department and the Graduate College.

A word of caution from experience.  Collecting this kind of information is only useful if we as the faculty are roughly calibrated on how we score.  Otherwise the same score will have different meaning when assigned by different faculty and computing any kind of descriptive statistics (e.g., averages) is not going to yield much useful information.  In other words, without some calibration training, we may produce data but it might be challenging to interpret what the data really mean. 

Assessment Activity:  TTE faculty have not used a consistent rubric for evaluating progress of students in the doctoral programs and the current effort to develop outcomes assessment is a work in progress.  Faculty who teach in the graduate programs are currently involved in discussions of revisions to the graduate program requirements, content, as well as discussion of outcomes assessments.  The chart above and rubric below are first attempts to evaluate doctoral work consistently and will be revised after pilot assessments and faculty training to calibrate scores so that scoring is consistent across faculty.

 Please see atttachments for Teaching and Teacher Education Guildeles for Satisfactory Progres and  Rubric for Dissertation Proposal and Dissertation Defense.

Assessment Findings: 

Assessment Finding for the Teach Arizona M.Ed. Program

Student performance on the Student Teaching Assessment for 2013 to 2015 has been compiled. Students composite scores for each of the 10 InTASC standards were averaged. The results appear below.

Average rubric score for Capstone final assessment 2013-15 (n=137)

InTasc Standard

Average Score (4 point maximum)

1 - Learner Development

3.26

2 - Learning Differences 

3.15

3 - Learning Environments

3.44

4 - Content Knowledge

3.39

5 - Application of Content

3.23

6 - Assessment

3.23

7 - Planning for Instruction

3.31

8 - Instructional Strategies

3.29

9 - Professional Learning and Ethics

3.74

10 - Leadership and Collaboration

3.34

 

Updated date: Mon, 04/18/2016 - 15:33