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Exemplary Website - Management and Organizations: Graduate Programs


Overview: 
The doctoral program in Management and Organizations provides opportunities for students to acquire an in-depth understanding of individual behavior, small group and team behavior, and organizational structures and processes. The program provides training and encourages research at all of these three levels of analysis. Management and Organizations students are encouraged to participate in a variety of research topics and have access to a number of support tools, including the Decision Behavior Laboratory and an expansive subject pool. Students also enjoy a 1:2 student-to-faculty ratio, minimal teaching loads, small class sizes, a collegial atmosphere, and competitive funding. By focusing on research, doctoral students in the Management and Organizations Department are able to successfully compete at the highest levels in the academic marketplace upon graduation. Only a small number of Ph.D. students are admitted each year, enabling students to work closely with faculty members and acquire a solid foundation in theory formulation, research design, and methodological skills. Training encompasses theories and methodologies from psychology, sociology, political science, and management. Management and Organizations faculty and graduate students consistently publish in top-tier journals such as Academy of Management Journal, Administrative Science Quarterly, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Journal of Applied Psychology, and Personnel Psychology. Several faculty members are serving as editors of top journals and many serve on a multiple editorial boards. Based on a ranking of 2011 research productivity in top-tier management journals, the Department of Management and Organizations ranked in the top 5 schools worldwide — a notable accomplishment considering the ranking is based on total publications in top-tier journals and is not adjusted for department size.
 

Expected Learning Outcomes: 

Doctoral students should be able to:Expected Learning Outcomes: Learning outcomes for graduate programs are usually easier to focus since these programs tend to be more specific. Keeping the outcomes to a small number aids in building the assessment activities, many of which you are already doing in your graduate program. This program does an excellent job in consolidating their outcomes without losing the detail.

  • Learning Outcome 1: Evaluate relevant literature, articulate and contrast theoretical approaches and the factors that affect the behavior of individuals, small groups, teams and organizational structures.
  • Learning Outcome 2: Carefully consider constructs of interest, identify, design and execute theoretically meaningful and methodological robust research.
  • Learning Outcome 3: Contribute to the distribution of information to the academic and wider communities  through publications or presentation of original findings or through distribution of information through excellence in teaching.
Assessment Activities: 

Direct Measures of Learning Outcomes
Doctoral Students: Assessment of Learning outcomesAssessment Activities: Use of both direct and indirect measures helps make your assessment activities stronger. M & O uses rubrics to evaluate their graduate students on a yearly basis. Although program numbers are small, indirect measures and self-analysis by the students help the direct measures to program excellent information and findings.

To assess these three learning outcomes all doctoral students are evaluated annually, in Spring term, on the three learning outcomes by a committee of three faculty members using the following rubric.  During the 2014-2015 academic year there were nine doctoral students associated with the department and all were evaluated.

Rubric for assessing Management and Organizations Doctoral Students’ knowledge and skills

 

Learning

Outcomes

1. Evaluate relevant literature, articulate and contrast theoretical approaches and the factors that affect the behavior of individuals, small groups, teams and organizational structures.

2. Carefully analyze constructs of interest, identify, design and execute theoretically meaningful and methodological robust research.

3. Contribute to the distribution  of information to the academic and wider communities through publications or presentations of original findings or through the distribution of information through excellence in teaching.

 

3

Exceeds

expectations

Student fully evaluates the relevant literature, articulates and contrasts theoretical approaches of the factors that affect the behavior of individuals, small groups, teams and organizational structures.

Student fully analyzes constructs of interest, identify, design and execute theoretically meaningful and methodological robust research.

Student is fully active in contributing to the distribution of knowledge through distribution of high-quality research through published works and presentations and through excellence in teaching.

 

2

Meets

expectations

Student is only partially evaluates the relevant literature, articulates and contrasts theoretical approaches of the factors that affect the behavior of individuals, small groups, teams and organizational structures.

 

Student is only partially analyzes constructs of interest, identify, design and execute theoretically meaningful and methodological robust research.

 

Student is only moderately successful in contributing to the distribution of knowledge through distribution of high-quality research through published works and presentations and through excellence in teaching.

 

1

Does not meet

expectations

Student does not successfully evaluate relevant literature, articulate and contrast theoretical approaches to better understand the factors that affect the behavior of individuals, small groups, teams and organizational structures.

Student does not successfully analyze constructs of interest, identify, design and execute theoretically meaningful and methodological robust research.

Student is not at all successful in contributing to the distribution of  knowledge through distribution of high-quality research through published works and presentations and through excellence in teaching.

 

Indirect Measures of Learning Outcomes
Doctoral Students: Self-Assessment Survey

To further assess these learning outcomes, doctoral students were  asked to describe the extent to which they feel prepared to complete the tasks described in the six learning outcomes. The six items read as follows:

Strongly Agree --- Agree --- Neither Agree nor Disagree --- Disagree --- Strongly Disagree

1.  I feel that I will be able to evaluate relevant literature, articulate and contrast theoretical approaches to better understand the factors that affect the behavior of individuals, small groups, teams and organizational structures.

2.  I feel that I will be able to carefully analyze constructs of interest, identify, design and execute theoretically meaningful and methodological robust research.

3.  I feel that I will be able to contribute to the world’s knowledge through distribution of high-quality research through published works and presentations and through excellence in teaching.

 

Assessment Findings: 

Doctoral Students: Assessment of Learning OutcomesAssessment Findings: Use of graphs is recommended when reporting data. They allow quick overviews while enabling the drilling down to more specific points when appropriate. Keep in mind that tying the findings to the outcomes is important.

Figure 1 shows the results of the annual spring-semester assessment of each of the doctoral students relative to the three learning outcomes of interest and portrays the percentage of students who exceeded expectationsmet expectations or did not meet expectations. During the 2014-2015 academic year there were nine doctoral students associated with the department and all were evaluated.

 

 

Figure 2 shows a strong positive relationship between time spent in the program and overall summated scores for the three learning outcome measures for the doctoral students. Rubric scores were combined for all three learning outcome measures to create one overall summated score for each of the doctoral students. This suggests that doctoral students demonstrated higher levels of competencies with each additional year in the program.

 

Indirect Measures of Learning Outcomes
Doctoral Students: Self-Assessment of Learning Outcomes

Figure 3 shows the results of the survey which asked all nine doctoral students to assess their own mastery of the three learning outcome measures of interest and portrays the percentage of students for each level of agreement for each statement. 

 

Change in Response to Findings: 

Assessment Results are presented periodically at the Management and Organizations faculty meetings.  Discussions surrounding the results focus on how to best improve our curriculum as well as the assessment procedures themselves. The results inform our course and curriculum design, student advising activities, and resource allocation.Change in Response to Findings: Acknowledging what is going well is just as important as what is not. Faculty discussions of findings is key when deciding what, if any, changes are necessary. If you include the entire faculty, then they will take ownership in making changes in their areas if required

Generally, the results suggest high levels of mastery of the three learning outcomes as measured by both the student performance measures as well as the student self-report data and that students perform better on all of the learning outcomes with each additional year of training in the program.

While we find these results encouraging, we also find opportunities for improvement.  Comparisons of the relative performance across learning outcomes suggest that learning outcome number 3 which emphasized the importance of being able to contribute to the world’s knowledge through the distribution of high-quality research through published works, presentations and teaching scored the lowest of the three leaning outcome assessments.  Discussions are underway to explore ways in which we can improve students’ experience and provide additional opportunities throughout our curriculum. Additionally, it may be useful in future assessments to split the third learning outcome into two separate learning outcomes, one that is focused exclusively on distribution of original findings and the second focused on distribution of other knowledge through teaching.