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Exemplary Website - Management and Organizations: Undergraduate Program

Overview: 

Management and Organizations (M&O) is a diverse department that contains a number of specialization areas amongst its faculty. This diversity is reflected in the course offerings for specialized undergraduate courses and is seen in the heavy investment the Department makes in the College’s core classes. Faculty do research in, and offer classes in, the areas of human resource management, organizational behavior, judgment and decision making, and policy and strategy. The undergraduate major, Business Management (BMGT), reflects this by allowing majors to choose five of the six courses required for the major from among numerous M&O courses along with selected courses from other departments and colleges. Indeed, it is arguably the most flexible and diverse of undergraduate majors in the Eller College of Management.

The goal of the Business Management degree program is to provide students with the skills and knowledge to successfully identify the characteristics and strategies that make some firms more successful than others and methods for implementing those strategies that maximize success. Students learn to manage the relationship that exists between a firm, its strategy and its environment.  This relationship is complex, uncertain and always changing.  Top managers shape and guide this relationship, making strategic decisions that change the organization’s capabilities, shift its position in the environment, or lead the firm into new businesses using the multi-disciplinary perspective demanded of a general manager – irrespective of the industry.

Expected Learning Outcomes: 

Students should be able to:Expected Learning Outcomes: Note the use of strong verbs in the outcome statements.  These outcomes are important because they represent what your faculty most value for student learning.  Don’t forget that outside stakeholders may also refer to these outcomes for program information.

  • Learning Outcome 1: Evaluate firm competitive positioning and assess firm-level resources and capabilities
  • Learning Outcome 2: Analyze strategic business situations, formulate and implement strategies to organize the firm for success
  • Learning Outcome 3: Assess the dynamics of competition and understand how economic, social, political, and technological forces can affect strategic positioning and long-term profitability
  • Learning Outcome 4: Understand and manage the complex ethical and social issues facing organizations as they develop and implement appropriate competitive agendas
  • Learning Outcome 5: Apply frameworks to the complicated problems of actual businesses
  • Learning Outcome 6: Diagnose strategic issues, evaluate strategic alternatives, and formulate workable plans of action
Assessment Activities: 

Direct Measures of Learning Outcomes

Graduating Seniors: Case AnalysesAssessment Activities: The learning outcomes are mapped with great detail to specific assessment activities. Direct measurement is facilitated by use of faculty-developed rubrics. Indirect measures, such as exit surveys, are also used to gather self-reported data.

To assess these learning outcomes graduating seniors are required to complete a series of case analyses and are assessed on their presentations and final reports.  These case analyses require students to engage in simulations of actual managerial activities involving data from the following real-life managerial problems.  Students are evaluated by the faculty who teach the Senior Capstone class (MGMT471 - Strategic Management) on the extent to which they demonstrate competences assessed by the six learning outcomes.

  • Learning Outcome 1: Cases 2 and 3 assess the first learning outcome by evaluating firms’ competitive positioning and assessing the firm-level resources and capabilities. These cases required students to demonstrate mastery of competitive positioning and advantage via differentiation as utilized by Ducati and via cost leadership as utilized by Dell.
  • Learning Outcome 2: Cases 5 and 10 assess the second learning outcome of analyzing strategic business situations, and formulating and implementing strategies to organize the firm for success. These cases required students to articulate and evaluate industry rules of competition and demonstrate mastery of strategy implementation and corporate governance as shown by the Circus industry and as executed by Honda.
  • Learning Outcome 3: Cases 8 and 9 assess the third learning outcome of assessing the dynamics of competition and understanding how economic, social, political, and technological forces can affect strategic positioning and long-term profitability. These cases required students to interpret and evaluate the corporate strategies implemented by Allianz and Icebreaker.
  • Learning Outcome 4: Cases 4 and 11assess the fourth learning outcome of understanding and managing the complex ethical and social issues facing organizations as they develop and implement competitive agendas. These cases required students to evaluate the distinctive governance structure, corporate culture and organizational process in determining the general role of strategy and culture in management as implemented by Google, Inc. and by Wal-Mart.
  • Learning Outcome 5: Cases 1 and 12 assess the fifth learning outcome of applying strategic frameworks to the complicated problems of actual businesses.  These cases assessed applications of industry analyses that utilizedPorter’s Five Forces model and evaluated the ways in which the social initiatives are aligned with the strategic goals of as demonstrated by Esquel and the “Cola Wars”.
  • Learning Outcome 6: Cases 6 and 7 assess the sixth learning outcome of diagnosing strategic issues, evaluating strategic alternatives, and formulating workable plans of action as applied to examples of disruptive innovation as demonstrated by Delta Airlines and Apple, Inc.

Assessment of each of these learning outcomes used the following assessment rubric:

Rubric for assessing Management and Organizations Undergraduate Students’ knowledge and skills – Part 1

 

Learning
Outcomes

1. Evaluate firms’ competitive positioning and assess firm-level resources and capabilities
(Assessed by cases 2 & 3)

2. Analyze strategic business situations, formulate and implement strategy to organize the firm for success  (Assessed by cases 5 & 10)

3. Assess the dynamics of competition and understand how economic, social, political, and technological forces can affect strategic positioning and long-term profitability  (Assessed by cases 8 & 9)

3

Exceeds
expectations

Student fully evaluates the firm’s competitive positioning and assesses firm-level resources and capabilities

Student fully analyzes the strategic business situations and formulates a thorough and complete strategy

Student fully assesses the dynamics of competition and fully integrates the economic, social, political, and technological forces that affect strategic positioning and long-term profitability

2

Meets
expectations

Student only partially evaluates the firm’s competitive positioning and assesses firm-level resources and capabilities

Student only partially analyzes the strategic business situations and formulates a an incomplete strategy

 

Student only partially assesses the dynamics of competition and integrates only some of the economic, social, political, and technological forces that affect strategic positioning and long-term profitability

1

Does not meet
expectations

Student does not successfully evaluate firm’s competitive positioning and assesses firm-level resources and capabilities

 

 

Student does not successfully analyzes the strategic business situations and formulates an insufficient strategy

 

 

Student creates an insufficient assessment of the dynamics of competition and does not address the economic, social, political, and technological forces that affect strategic positioning and long-term profitability

 

Rubric for assessing Management and Organizations Undergraduate Students’ knowledge and skills – Part 2

 

Learning
Outcomes

Incorporate and manage the complex ethical and social issues facing organizations as they develop and implement competitive agendas
(Assessed by cases 4 & 11)

Apply strategic frameworks to the complicated problems of actual businesses
(Assessed by cases 1 & 12)

Diagnose strategic issues, evaluate strategic alternatives, and formulate workable plans of action

(Assessed by cases 6 & 7)

 

3
Exceeds
expectations

 

Student fully manages the complex ethical and social issues facing organizations and  develops and implements competitive agendas

Student fully applies strategic frameworks to the complicated problems of actual businesses

Student fully diagnoses strategic issues, evaluates strategic alternatives, and formulate workable plans of action

 

2
Meets

expectations

Student only partially manages the complex ethical and social issues facing organizations and  develops and implements competitive agendas

 

Student only partially applies strategic frameworks to the complicated problems of actual businesses

 

Student only partially diagnoses strategic issues, evaluates strategic alternatives, and formulate workable plans of action

 
 
1
Does not meet

expectations

Student does not successfully manage the complex ethical and social issues facing organizations and  develops and implements competitive agendas

Student does not successfully apply strategic frameworks to the complicated problems of actual businesses and  formulates an insufficient strategy

Student creates an insufficient implementation of the strategic issues, does not fully evaluate strategic alternatives, nor formulates workable plans of action

Indirect Measures of Learning Outcomes
Graduating Seniors: Exit Survey

To further assess these learning outcomes graduating seniors are asked to describe the extent to which they feel prepared to complete the tasks described in the six learning outcomes. The six items read as follows:

Strongly Agree --- Agree --- Neither Agree nor Disagree --- Disagree --- Strongly Disagree

1.  I feel that I will be able to evaluate a firm's competitive positioning and assess firm-level resources and capabilities.

2.  I feel that I will be able to analyze strategic business situations, formulate appropriate strategies, and organize a firm for success.

3.  I feel that I will be able to assess the dynamics of competition and understand how economic, social, political, and technological forces can affect strategic positioning and long-term profitability.

4.  I feel that I will be able to understand and manage the complex ethical and social issues facing organizations as they develop and implement competitive agendas.

5.  I feel that I will be able to apply frameworks to the complicated problems of actual businesses.

6.  I feel that I will be able to diagnose strategic issues, evaluate strategic alternatives, and formulate workable plans of action.

 

Assessment Findings: 

Assessment Findings: Presentation of findings is everything. Keep findings simple and easy to read and understand. Use of graphs provides readers with “big picture” as this department’s findings show.

Graduating Seniors: Case Analyses

Figure 1 shows the results of the case analyses designed to assess the six learning outcomes of interest and portrays the percentage of students who exceeded expectationsmet expectations or did not meet expectations for each of the six learning outcomes for 113 graduating seniors measured in 2014. 

Figure 2 shows the results of the case analyses designed to assess the six learning outcomes of interest and portrays the percentage of students who exceeded expectations, met expectations or did not meet expectations for each of the six learning outcomes for 110 graduating seniors in 2015.

 

Graduating Seniors: Self-Assessment of Learning Outcomes, Survey results

Figure 3 shows the results of the self-assessment survey that asked students to assess their own mastery of the six learning outcomes of interest.  Students were asked to judge the degree to which they agreed with statements that reflected mastery for each of the six learning outcomes.  The percentage of the students who chose each option is shown in Figure 3. Thirty-five of the 2015 graduating seniors responed to this survey.  


 

Change in Response to Findings: 

Change in Response to Findings: Reviewing the findings with the whole faculty is critical if program changes are to be made. This program presents results at faculty meetings and discusses what changes may need to be made. Being inclusive helps to sell the assessment program to your faculty.

Assessment Results are presented periodically at the Management and Organizations faculty meetings.  Discussions surrounding the results focus on how to best improve our curriculum as well as the assessment procedures themselves. The results inform our course and curriculum design, student advising activities, and resource allocation.

Generally, the results suggest high levels of mastery of the six learning outcomes as measured by both the student performance measures as well as the student self-report data. Student performance measures show that nearly all of our graduating seniors are mastering the six learning outcomes. When we average student performance assessments across all of the six learning outcomes we find that over 95% of the students reach either the “meets” or “exceeds expectations” scores. And when we average student self-report measures across all of the six learning outcomes we find that over 90% of the students report that they either “strongly agree” or “agree” that they will be able to apply these skills in the future.

While we find these results encouraging, we also find opportunities for improvement.  Comparisons of the relative performance across learning outcomes suggest that learning outcome number 5 which reads, “apply frameworks to the complicated problems of actual businesses” scores the lowest of the six leaning outcome assessments suggested by both student performance and student self-report measures.  Discussions are underway to explore ways in which we can improve student experience throughout our curriculum.