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Indigenous Peoples Law & Policy Program

Overview: 

For more than a quarter of a century, Arizona Law has been a leader in the field of Indian and Indigenous peoples law. The Indigenous Peoples Law & Policy (IPLP) Program was founded in 2001, originally to administer only the LLM program. It has since expanded to become the umbrella organization overseeing all aspects of Indian and Indigenous law at Arizona Law. IPLP now encompasses the academic programs, the international projects, and the UN Special Rapporteur Support Project. The academic portion of IPLP includes a certificate program as part of the JD (established 2009), the LLM and SJD programs, Arizona Law’s chapter of the Native American Law Students’ Association, UANativeNet.com (a distance learning website), and a non-degree Continuing Education Certificate in Indigenous Governance (established 2011).

IPLP is unique not only because it is the only law school in the world offering all three law degrees with a concentration in Indian and Indigenous peoples law, but also because of its approach to education. Students are educated both in the classroom and in the real world in an integrated approach, placing students in all programs in teh same classes to learn from eath other, as well as from a diverse group of faculty who are leaders both in their academic field and in the community. IPLP is designed to prepare lawyers to meet the unique and difficult set of challenges confronting law reform and policymaking in Indigenous peoples’ rights in the 21st century.

Expected Learning Outcomes: 

MPS

1. Students will gain knowledge of the historical, legal, socio-economic, cultural issues, as well as the federal law and policy relating to indigenous peoples in the United States through successful completion of required coursework:

     • Law, Policy, and Economic Development in Indian Country (1 credit)

     • Comparative Indigenous Governance (1 credit)

     • Indigenous Peoples’ Rights Under International Law (1 credit)

     • Comparative Legal Systems and Their Role in Nation Building (1 credit)

     • Making Change Happen (1 credit)

     • Evidence for Indigenous Governance Principles (1 credit)

2. Students will conduct original research or engage in an experiential learning project through completion of the required thesis or internship placement.

3. Students will develop critical thinking skills and demonstrate an ability to identify legal arguments, articulate and critique legal arguments using legal reasoning, develop alternative legal frameworks, and defend their position through legal reasoning.

 

LLM

1. Students will gain knowledge of the historical, legal, socio-economic, cultural issues, as well as the federal law and policy relating to indigenous peoples in the United States through successful completion of the Federal Indian Law (LAW 631A) course.

2. Students will understand the treaties, mechanisms, and international and regional bodies which protect and promote human rights through successful completion of either the International Human Rights (LAW 659) course or the International Human Rights and Indigenous Peoples (LAW 527) course.

3. Students will communicate effectively in writing and orally an in-depth grasp of the contemporary legal issues related to federal law and policy relating to indigenous peoples in the United States and human rights law relating to indigenous peoples worldwide.

4. Students will conduct legal and interdisciplinary research relevant to indigenous peoples’ law and policy issues.

5. Through use of the Socratic teaching method, students will develop critical thinking skills and demonstrate an ability to identify legal arguments, articulate and critique legal arguments using legal reasoning, develop alternative legal frameworks, and defend their position through legal reasoning.

 

SJD

1. Students will gain knowledge of the historical, legal, socio-economic, cultural, and federal law and policy relating to indigenous peoples in the United States through successful completion of the Federal Indian Law (LAW 631A) course.

2. Students will understand the treaties, mechanisms, and international and regional bodies which protect and promote human rights through successful completion of either the International Human Rights (LAW 659) course or the International Human Rights and Indigenous Peoples (LAW 527) course.

3. Students will communicate effectively in writing and orally an in-depth grasp of contemporary legal issues on a specific area of law, through completion of their doctoral dissertation and oral defense of their dissertation.

4. Students will conduct independent legal and interdisciplinary research on a specific area of law through completion of their SJD dissertation.

5. Through use of the Socratic teaching method, students will develop critical thinking skills and demonstrate an ability to identify legal arguments, articulate and critique legal arguments using legal reasoning, develop alternative legal frameworks, and defend their position through legal reasoning.

 

 

Assessment Activities: 

We will conduct assessments of our LLM and SJD students’ performance and completion of their expected learning outcomes through evaluation of their performance in required curriculum, course evaluations, student exit surveys, SJD dissertation evaluations, and evaluations of oral SJD dissertation defenses.

 

 

Assessment Findings: 

The assessment will be implemented starting in the Fall 2017 semester. Assessments will be completed following the end of the Spring 2018 semester.

Updated date: Mon, 10/02/2017 - 12:44