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B.A. in Film and Television

Overview: 

The B.A. in Film and Television provides students with an understanding of the history, industry, and creative processes of film and television.  The program prepares highly motivated, imaginative students for careers in the creative and business aspects of film and television, as well as for advanced study in graduate school or entertainment law.  B.A. students graduate equipped with grounding and advanced study in history, theory, industry practices, research, written and oral presentation, and the creative development process.

Expected Learning Outcomes: 

At the completion of the degree Students will be able to:

  1. Understand the historical development of contemporary aesthetic, narrative, and industry practices of film and television
  2. Conduct textual analysis of film and television formats and genres
  3. Gather and interpret research from primary and secondary sources, such as trade journals, databases, and academic essays
  4. Demonstrate comprehension of how film and television are shaped by the global media economy (production, distribution, and exhibition) and by artistic and cultural forces
  5. Understand the working practices, standards, and collaboration necessary to the creative process of film and television
  6. Participate in and contribute to a real world professional environment
Assessment Activities: 

FTV 496c Final Research Essay – The Research Essay requires students to construct a research paper of approximately 2500-3000 words (including a work cited page) on a course-appropriate topic. Over the course of the semester, the students design a research project, construct a thesis statement, gather the data to support their research and finally write the Final Research Essay that draws conclusions based on the research.  Elements of the research essay are scored on a scale of 0-10 with 10-9 indicating mastery; 8-9 is a solid understanding; 7-8 is adequate; 6-7 is weak understanding; below 6 is lack of understanding.  Below are the metrics used in each category, followed by the Student Learning Outcome it is designed to produce.

·       Study Design (EOL 1)

               Clear thesis

               Well-defined research plan

·       Data and Evidence (EOL 3)

               Appropriate data and evidence

               Interpretation of data and evidence

·       Conclusions (EOL 4)

               Implementation of method of analysis

               Understanding of context

FTV 496c Textual Analysis Assignment – The Textual Analysis Assignment requires students to demonstrate the ability to analyze a media text in terms of its form, narrative or style as relevant to the course topic.  Students will complete an assignment of approximately 500-750 words that will be evaluated based on the students’ abilities to analyze the text and draw clear and appropriate conclusions based on this analysis.  Elements of the textual analysis assignment are scored on a scale of 0-10 with 10-9 indicating mastery; 8-9 is a solid understanding; 7-8 is adequate; 6-7 is weak understanding; below 6 is lack of understanding.  Below are the metrics used in each category, followed by the Student Learning Outcome it is designed to produce.

·       Gathering relevant textual data (EOL 2)

·       Supported interpretations and conclusions (EOL 2)

FTV 493 Final Takeaway Report from the Student -- The Final Take Away Report is used to assess how much students learned at their internships.  FTV 493 Internship is a capstone experience for all FTV majors.  The internship is an opportunity for students to apply their skills and knowledge of the film and television producing process.  This rubric is also an assessment of the internship, which is expected to provide experiential learning in which students apply knowledge and participate in the creative process. 

In the Final Takeaway Report, students reflect on the skills that they developed during the internship; what they learned about the working practices and standards of the film and television industry; the degree to which they applied their knowledge during the internship; and the degree to which they participated in the creative process of film and/or television relevant to the internship.

·       Skills and working practices developed (EOL 5)

·       Knowledge applied and participated in creative process (EOL 5)

FTV 493 Intern Supervisor Evaluation – The Intern Supervisor Evaluation assesses student performance at the internship.  The Intern Supervisor provides two evaluations of the student intern:  a grade recommendation and a letter of evaluation.  From these, we assess the degree to which the student met the professional expectations of the field and the quality of the student’s contributions to the creative process of film and/or television.

·       -     Professional expectations met (EOL 6)

·       -       Quality of creative contributions (EOL 6)

Assessment Findings: 

Activity

Outcome #s

2014-15 Average

n=(Number particpating)

2015-16 Average

n=(Number participating)

2016-17 Average

n=(Number participating)

496c Senior Seminar

Semester research project

(Points Possible: 10)

 

1, 3, 4

Avg: 8.69

N=66

Fall N=16; Avg=8.78

Spring N=32; Avg=8.49

Overall Average:  8.64 (N=48)

Fall N=16; Avg=8.18

Spring N=34; Avg=8.13

Overall Average: 8.16 (N=50)

496c Senior Seminar

Textual analysis essay

(Points Possible: 10)

2

Avg: 8.30

N=66

Fall N=16; Avg=8.18

Spring N=31; Avg=8.25

Overall Average:  8.22 (N=47)

Fall N=17; Avg=8.78

Spring N=31; Avg=7.97

Overall Average: 8.38 (N=47)

493 Internship

Final Takeaway Report

(Points Possible 10)

 

5

Avg: 9.41

N=33

Summer N=7; Avg=9.21

Fall N=11; Avg=9.63

Overall Average:  9.56 (N=32)

Summer N=22; Avg=9.72

Fall N=17; Avg=9.85

Spring N=10; Avg=10

Overall AVerage: 9.86 (N=49)

493 Internship

Supervisor Evaluation

(Points Possible: 10)         

 

6

Avg: 9.39

N=33

Summer N=7; Avg=9.79

Fall N=11; Avg=9.59

Spring N=14; Avg=9.68

Overall Average: 9.69 (N=32)

Summer N=22; Avg=9.58

Fall N=17; Avg=9.65

Spring N=10; Avg=10

Overall Average: 9.74 (N=49)

FTV 496c Textual Analysis Assignment 8.38/10

   Gathering of relevant textual data

   Interpretations of textual data

The 2016-17 results from this finding demonstrate that students’ textual analysis skills continue to strengthen as they are again slightly higher than the previous year.   Our continued emphasis on textual analysis appears effective.  The students are capable of analyzing the stylistic and aesthetic qualities of films and television programs.  Although they have developed the tools to look at media texts and analyze elements such as lighting, camera angles, sets, etc., terminology and description sometimes still present problems.  This indicates that they have a strong foundation in the language of film and television and are able to conduct textual analysis of film and television formats and genres. (ELO 2)

FTV 496c Final Research Project: 8.22/10

Constructing a clear thesis

Developing a well-defined research plan

Finding appropriate data and evidence

Interpreting data and evidence

Selecting appropriate methods of analysis

Understanding context of research

The results of this assessment are slightly lower than 2015-16, although student work is still well within the range indicating that they have a successful understanding of the material.  The data suggests that current students understand the historical development of contemporary aesthetic, narrative, and industry practices of film and television (ELO 1); are able to gather and interpret research from primary and secondary sources such as trade journals, databases, and academic essays (ELO 3); demonstrate comprehension of how film and television are shaped by the global media economy (production, distribution, and exhibition) and by artistic and cultural forces (ELO 4). Our students continue to need more practice and assistance in developing strong research projects that utilize appropriate research methods to understand a topic within its larger context.

FTV 493 Final Takeaway Report from the Student: 9.56/10

Skills and working practices developed

Knowledge applied and participated in creative process

FTV 493 Intern Supervisor Evaluation: 9.69/10

Professional expectations met

Quality of creative contributions

2016-17 assessment scores continue to be strong and even increased.  These results indicate that all of the internships provided a professional environment and experiential learning in which students applied knowledge, developed skills, and participated in the film and/or television creative process. 

Supervisor evaluations of student performance continue to be exemplary, with many supervisors expressing interest in hiring their interns in the future.  A majority of the students met professional expectations and contributed in meaningful ways to the creative process.

(this table should demonstrate a quantitative and qualitative evaluation that is supported by your assessment tools)

Indirect Student Survey Outcomes

Exit Survey BA Film & Television

Spring 2017 Avg. Score n=52

I understand the historical development of contemporary aesthetic, narrative, and industry practices of film and television.

3.67

I can conduct textual analysis of film and television formats and genres.

3.85

I am able to gather and interpret research from primary and secondary sources, such as trade journals, databases, and academic essays

3.63

I understand how film and television are shaped by the global media economy (production, distribution, and exhibition) and by artistic and cultural forces.

3.87

I understand the working practices, standards, and collaboration necessary to the creative process of film and television.

3.79

I have gained ‘real world’ experience through an internship in film and television*

3.5

Score Range: 4=strongly agree    3=agree    2=disagree    1=strongly disagree

*n=44 (8 students have not taken an internship at the time of the survey)

Change in Response to Findings: 

FTV 496c Textual Analysis and Final Research Project – Based on the past two years of data, we found that students improved slightly in the area of textual analysis.  An increased focus on this topic based on last year’s findings may have contributed to the greater numbers of students meeting or exceeding the expectations of our outcomes.  Faculty still feel that students need increased emphasis in this area.  We will continue our focus on textual analysis by considering how lower division classes can encourage students to utilize the language of film and television analysis to develop insightful arguments about the construction of meaning in film and television. 

We also recognize that the numbers for the Final Research Project have declined slightly over the last two years.  Based on decreased numbers last year, we included assignments in two foundational courses that emphasize thesis statement construction and research gathering.  We are also paying increased attention to these areas in all upper-division courses.  We hope to see the results of these efforts as students progress through the program over the next two years.

Additionally, continued faculty discussion of foundational courses assists us in keeping track of assignments and student progress that will strengthen student success within the program.

FTV 493 Final Takeaway Report from the Student and Intern Supervisor Evaluation – Film and Television offers a strong and successful internship program.  At times, students have difficulty connecting their coursework to the experiences that they have in professional environments.  Continued effort is made to demonstrate to students the very real connections between what they learn in class and the knowledge that helps them stand out during their internships. 

We implemented initial modifications to FTV 303 Professional Practices, the required pre-internship course, and changes will continue to be incorporated next year.  This course will further stress the importance of a professional demeanor and the need for realistic expectations about the internship workplace.

Exit Survey (Data reported and changed each fall on assessment Web Site)

Findings from the exit survey indicate that students recognize the skills that they develop in the B.A. in Film and Television.  As we found with last year’s survey, students feel least strong about receiving “real world” experience.  Although the numbers for this are still high, we will continue to examine why students may not be making a clear connection between their internship work and the “real world.”

Updated date: Thu, 09/21/2017 - 09:44