You are here

Gender & Women's Studies: Graduate Programs

Overview: 

Ph.D. in Gender & Women’s Studies

Learning Outcomes, Assessment Methods, and Results

 

                                                                                                                     

A student graduating with a Ph.D. in Gender and Women’s Studies will:

 

#

Outcome

Proposed Assessment Methods

Results

1

Demonstrate a firm foundation in feminist theories, feminist and related social movements, and critical race and ethnic studies.

 

Direct 1: Written and Oral Comprehensive Examinations

 

Direct 2: Dissertation Proposal

Direct 3: Dissertation Defense

Indirect 1: Graduate Studies Committee Feedback

2

Conduct innovative and interdisciplinary scholarship and/or research in the field of gender and women’s studies, using methods appropriate to their scholarship and informed by feminist critiques of epistemology.

 

Direct 1: Dissertation Proposal

 

Direct 2: Dissertation Defense

Direct 3: Academic or Professional Activities Represented on Student CVs and Student/Alumni Survey

Indirect 1: Graduate Studies Committee Feedback

3

Employ feminist pedagogical and learner-centered educational techniques and current teaching technologies.

 

Direct 1: TA and ABD Teacher Supervisor Evaluations

 

Indirect 1: Graduate Studies Committee Feedback

Indirect 2: DGS Yearly review/report to Faculty on Student Annual Reports

 

 


4

Demonstrate a variety of professional skills, including how to write a CV, how to successfully market accomplishments, how to apply for jobs in academia and elsewhere, how to create a syllabus, how to prepare conference proposals, how to deliver a conference presentation, how to publish, and how to write a grant application and carry out a grant funded project as appropriate. 

 

Direct 1: Academic or Professional Activities Represented on Student CVs and Student/Alumni Survey

 

Indirect 1: Graduate Studies Committee Feedback

Indirect 2: DGS Yearly review/report to Faculty on Student Annual Reports

 

Ph.D. Minor in Gender & Women’s Studies

 

A student graduating with a Ph.D. Minor in Gender and Women’s Studies will:

 

#

Outcome

Proposed Assessment Methods

Results

1

Demonstrate a firm foundation in feminist theories, feminist and related social movements, and critical race and ethnic studies.

 

Direct 1: Written and Oral Comprehensive Examinations

 

Direct 2: Dissertation Proposal

Direct 3: Dissertation Defense

Indirect 1: Student/Alumni Survey

2

Conduct scholarship that demonstrates knowledge of and engagement with the field of gender and women’s studies.

 

Direct 1: Dissertation Proposal

 

Direct 2: Dissertation Defense

Indirect 1: Student/Alumni Survey

 

 

 

Graduate Certificate in Gender & Women’s Studies

 

A student graduating with a Graduate Certificate in Gender and Women’s Studies will:

 

#

Outcome

Proposed Assessment Methods

Results

1

Demonstrate a firm foundation in feminist theories, feminist and related social movements, and critical race and ethnic studies.

 

Direct 1: Rubric evaluation of GWS 539A or GWS 539B paper.

 

Direct 2: Rubric evaluation of GWS 639 paper

Indirect 1: Student/Alumni Survey

2

Understand Gender and Women’s Studies as an academic field of study and be familiar with its major concepts and epistemological and methodological diversity.

 

Direct 1: Rubric evaluation of GWS 539A or GWS 539B paper.

 

Direct 2: Rubric evaluation of GWS 639 paper

Indirect 1: Student/Alumni Survey

 

 

 

MA/JD Degree

A student graduating with an MA/JD will:

 

 

 

#

Outcome

Proposed Assessment Methods

Results

1

Demonstrate a firm foundation in feminist theories, feminist and related social movements, and critical race and ethnic studies.

 

Direct 1: Coursework Portfolio

 

Direct 2: MA Paper Defense Rubric

Indirect 1: Student/Alumni Survey

Indirect 2: DGS Yearly/Review/Report to Faculty On Student Annual Reports

2

Demonstrate the ability to apply their knowledge of feminist theories and movements, as interconnected with other dimensions of structural inequality such as race/ethnicity and economic processes, in the practice of law.

 

Direct 1: Student CVs

 

Direct 2: MA Paper Defense Rubric

Indirect 1: Student Alumni Survey

Indirect 2: DGS Yearly/Review/Report to Faculty On Student Annual Reports

3

Produce original scholarship that investigates the interconnections of gender, law, and public policy, nationally and/or internationally.

 

Direct 1: Coursework Portfolio

 

Direct 2: MA Paper Defense Rubric

Indirect 1: Student/Alumni Survey

Indirect 2: DGS Yearly/Review/Report to Faculty On Student Annual Reports

         

 

 

 

Expected Learning Outcomes: 

List of Graduate Learning Outcomes

 

Ph.D. Students are expected to:

1)    Demonstrate a firm foundation in feminist theories, feminist and related social movements, and critical race and ethnic studies.

2)    Conduct innovative and interdisciplinary scholarship and/or research in the field of gender and women’s studies, using methods appropriate to their scholarship and informed by feminist critiques of epistemology.

3)    Employ feminist pedagogical and learner-centered educational techniques and current teaching technologies.

4)    Demonstrate a variety of professional skills, including how to write a CV, how to successfully market accomplishments, how to apply for jobs in academia and elsewhere, how to create a syllabus, how to prepare conference proposals, how to deliver a conference presentation, how to publish, and how to write a grant application and carry out a grant funded project as appropriate. 

Ph.D. Minor students are expected to:

1)    Demonstrate a firm foundation in feminist theories, feminist and related social movements, and critical race and ethnic studies.

2)    Conduct scholarship that demonstrates knowledge of and engagement with the field of gender and women’s studies.

 

GWS Grad Certificate students are expected to:

1)    Demonstrate a firm foundation in feminist theories, feminist and related social movements, and critical race and ethnic studies.

2)    Understand Gender and Women’s Studies as an academic field of study and be familiar with its major concepts and epistemological and methodological diversity.

 

MA/JD students are expected to:

1)    Demonstrate a firm foundation in feminist theories, feminist and related social movements, and critical race and ethnic studies.

2)    Demonstrate the ability to apply their knowledge of feminist theories and movements, as interconnected with other dimensions of structural inequality such as race/ethnicity and economic processes, in the practice of law.

3)    Produce original scholarship that investigates the interconnections of gender, law, and public policy, nationally and/or internationally.

Assessment Activities: 

 

Graduate Program Assessment Activities

As of November 4, 2013

Assessment Activity

PhD1

PhD2

PhD3

PhD4

Minor 1

Minor 2

Cert 1

Cert 2

JD 1

JD 2

JD 3

 

 

Direct Measures

TA and ABD Teacher Supervisor Evaluations

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Written and Oral Comprehensive Exam (Rubric)

X

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dissertation Proposal (Rubric)

X

X

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

Dissertation Defense (Rubric)

X

X

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

Academic or Professional Activities Represented on Student CVs and Student/Alumni Survey (info sections)

 

X

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

539A or B paper assessment (Rubric)

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

639 paper assessment (Rubric)

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

Student CVs (via Annual Report)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

Coursework Portfolio (Rubric)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

X

MA Paper Defense Rubric

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

X

X

Indirect Measures

Graduate Studies Committee Feedback from Members

X

X

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Student / Alumni Survey

 

 

 

 

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

DGS yearly review/report  to Faculty on Student Annual Reports

 

X

X

X

 

 

 

 

X

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment Findings: 

 

RESULTS for Ph.D. Program

Outcome 1: Students scored well on rubric evaluations of written and oral comprehensive exams and the dissertation proposals. As we have had only one dissertation defense thus far, we are not yet able make a programmatic level evaluation at that stage.

 

Outcome 2: Students scored well on rubric evaluations of dissertation proposals. As we have had only one dissertation defense thus far, we are not yet able make a programmatic-level evaluation at that stage. Student CVs demonstrate that students’ research is being accepted for presentation in a variety of interdisciplinary venues. While only a few have yet achieved any significant record of publication, a broader group are recipients of awards and acceptances for conference presentations; this suggests that as more students gain more seniority in the program, we will see an increase in peer reviewed publications and thus further positive evidence of learning regarding Outcome 2. The Graduate Committee, in response to feedback received from faculty and students, was prompted to re-evaluate the structure of course work in support of student learning of epistemology and methodology, determining that the combination of those two areas of knowledge in one required course (GWS 684) was not working as effectively as it might (changes in response to this finding are discussed below).

 

Outcome 3: Based on a DGS review of supervisor evaluations of TAs from Fall 2009-Spring 2013 (44 separate evaluations), it is clear that the overwhelming majority of GWS students who serve as TAs are dedicated, hardworking and responsible teachers, knowledgeable of course material, and comfortable and competent in the use of D2L. In 29 instances the TA was given the highest rating (Superior/Outstanding); in 13 the TA was found to be satisfactory; in only 2 was the TA rated as unsatisfactory. Supervisors’ comments describe many TAs in ways that clearly indicate use of feminist and learner centered pedagogical approaches including: dedication to their students, ability to engage students in discussion in lecture sessions as well as their own discussion sections, use of small group work and other techniques that engage all students as active participants, and ability to build rapport and foster intellectual curiosity. Through the Graduate Committee and other department venues, a number of graduate students have expressed a desire for more instruction and support in feminist and critical pedagogy.

 

Outcome 4: Review of current student CVs show that as of Fall 2013, two students have published essays in peer reviewed academic journals (during their tenure at UA); others have works in the pipeline and have published book reviews. Half of our students have participated in international and national conferences. In doing so, they have made contributions across an impressive range of disciplines and interdisciplinary fields. Given that the program began in 2008 and that only 6 of 19 students have thus far passed their comprehensive exams and advanced to the “ABD” stage, we find that this demonstrates an appropriate level of professional knowledge with regard to proposing and presenting conference papers and submitting papers for publication. Other items, are not yet appropriate to assess at all, such as knowledge of how to apply for jobs. With regard to the professional skill of CV writing itself, the large majority of CVs are reasonably well designed. Current versions are a clear improvement over those submitted for annual reviews in Spring 2013, having had benefit of feedback on that version (prompted by a more negative assessment of that set of annual review CVs by the DGS), a CV workshop offered this Fall, and specific instructions for this submission.

 

RESULTS for Ph.D. Minor

Outcome 1: Students received high scores on rubric evaluations of Comprehensive Exams. We received no evaluations of Dissertation Proposals and too few evaluations of Dissertation Defenses to make a programmatic level evaluation at this time. Three students or alumni completed this question of the survey for a mean score of 9.33.

Outcome 2: We received no evaluations of Dissertation Proposals and too few evaluations of Disseration Defenses to make a programmatic level evaluation at this time. Three students or alumni completed this question of the survey for a mean score of 8.66

 

RESULTS for Graduate Certificate

Outcome 1: Rubric evaluations of papers will be conducted in the future; papers were not available to us at this time. Four students or alumni completed this question on the survey for a mean score of 9 (on a scale of 0-10).

Outcome 2: Rubric evaluations of papers will be conducted in the future because papers were not available to us at this time. Four students or alumni completed this question on the survey for a mean score of 8.25 (on a scale of 0-10). 

 

 

Change in Response to Findings: 

Many of the assessment findings presented here are new and thus have not yet been used to make changes. However, it is crucial to recognize that this formal assessment is only a supplement to the ongoing work done by the Graduate Committee and the Faculty to evaluate and improve the graduate programs. Such ongoing work is reflected in recent curricular changes, such as the elimination of the Feminist Knowledge Production course from the set of required core courses for the PhD, thus allowing students more flexibility in gaining methods training appropriate in kind and timing for their project, while integrating the study of feminist epistemology into the first-year required feminist theories sequence. Likewise, we have added an enhanced professionalization program as a one-unit course, based on the ongoing assessment processes conducted through graduate student and faculty input in the context of Graduate Committee and Faculty meetings.(

Updated date: Tue, 06/03/2014 - 11:01