You are here

Physics: Undergraduate Programs

Overview: 

The Physics Department offers two degree programs: a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Physics and a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in Physics.  In addition, we participate in the College of Science teacher preparation program, where a B.SC. in Science Education with a physics concentration can be obtained.  A major in physics teaching is available from the College of Education.  Most outcomes are common to all of these programs but we focus on the B.S. program since it is the more common degree pursued by physics students.

Expected Learning Outcomes: 

Program Outcomes

The undergraduate physics degree program should ensure that students attain the following outcomes upon completion of their degree:

  • Physics majors should have significant knowledge of the theories that form the basis of classical mechanics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics, optics, and thermodynamics.  Additionally, they should have some knowledge of more specialized topics such as solid state physics, nuclear physics, particle physics, and/or biophysics.
  • Physics majors should be able to design and conduct experiments in order to investigate physical phenomena.   They should be able to document, analyze, and critically interpret the results of these experiments.
  • Physics majors should be able to use mathematical or computational skills in order to investigate physical phenomena. They should be able to document, analyze, and critically interpret the results of their work.
  • Physics majors should be able to communicate their results through clear written reports and oral presentations.
  • Physics majors should be prepared to enter quality graduate degree programs in physics or to assume challenging technical positions in a variety of industries.

Program Outcome Assessment

  • Knowledge of the core disciplines (classical mechanics, electromagetism, quantum mechanics, ...) is assessed thrugh student performance in the classroom, student questionaires, instructor reflection, and national test scores.
  • Student ability to design and conduct experiments and to analzye and critically interpret the results is assessed through laboratory courses and independent research.
  • Student ability to use mathematical or computational techniques and to analyze and critically interpret the results is assessed through specific coursework and independent research.
  • Student ability to clearly communicate orally or in writing is assessed through specific course projects and senior research presentations.
  • Student ability to successfully compete for positions in quality graduate programs or industry is assessed through exit surveys which track the post baccalaureate positions secured by the students.

 

Updated date: Fri, 03/02/2012 - 09:52