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Management Information Systems: Graduate Program

Overview: 

The MIS department offers two graduate degree programs: a MS in MIS and a Ph.D. in Management with a major in MIS.

Our MS in MIS program requires a core curriculum that features technical and managerial components. These courses stress the development of analytical and critical thinking skills. The coursework in core and concentration areas prepares students for challenging careers involving the design, analysis, implementation and operation of computer-based information systems. In addition to classroom instruction, all students complete a team-based Master’s project with companies recruited by the department (e.g., Wal*Mart, Microsoft, Sanofi, IBM, Raytheon, Roche, and Honeywell). Many students also opt to complete an internship between their first and second years.

The doctoral program requires students to complete core MIS courses from the MS program. Further, they are also required to complete a core set of research methodology and statistics classes. Elective courses supplement the core courses and provide specialization. These courses reflect the faculty’s research strengths in the areas of collaborative systems, artificial intelligence, database development, systems analysis/design, global information systems, IT management strategy, information assurance, deception detection, and decision support. Our department has prided itself in producing the largest number of MIS doctoral graduates in the country.  While the doctoral program primarily prepares students for careers in academia, our graduates have also chosen research careers in government and private organizations.

Expected Learning Outcomes: 

The MIS faculty evaluates the learning outcomes for our Master of Science in Management Information Systems program through a variety of ways. These include exam questions, project work, case analysis, and presentations.

MS MIS: Learning Outcomes

By completing the MS program, students will meet the following learning outcomes.

  1. Understand and apply core knowledge in Management Information Systems (MIS)
  2. Identify and analyze requirements for information systems
  3. Understand and apply design principles in Information Systems
  4. Understand and apply system development & project management principles
  5. Effectively evaluate technology alternatives to solve problems in an MIS context
  6. Effectively communicate to both business and IT professionals

At a program level, we anticipate that achieving the learning outcomes can be measured through their obtaining gainful employment.
 

Ph.D. MIS : Learning Outcomes

By completion of the Ph.D. program in Business Administration, with a concentration in MIS, a student will:

  1. Demonstrate broad knowledge of the field of MIS
  2. Critically analyze published research results in his/her area of study
    • Integrate and analyze literature
  3. Conduct original research on a significant MIS problem
    • Design a study using appropriate methods
    • Analyze data using appropriate methods for the data collected
    • Extrapolate study results to broader implications for research and practice 
  4. Effectively communicate and defend results of research to peers and broader scientific audiences
    • Prepare a well-written dissertation/paper
    • Defend interpretations and conclusions
    • Anticipate next level of inquiry
  5. Deliver course content effectively and demonstrate impact on student learning

 

 

Assessment Activities: 

MS MIS: Assessment Activities

Learning outcome data have been collected from all the required core courses of the MS MIS program. For the majority of these courses, the outcome data from course offerings from Spring 2012 to Fall 2016 have been collected and analyzed. Instructors in each of the courses where outcome data were collected, have designed course assessment instruments for each of the course-level learning outcomes (CLs). The program-level SLOs are aggregations of the corresponding course-level outcome assessments. The attached SLO-CL matrix document describes in detail how the SLOs are mapped into specific CLs. The attached CL document provides the detailed definitions of all the CLs.

In the context of CLs, the question(s) that measures an outcome are designed to be independent of other questions, to allow for direct measurement of an outcome.  Raw scores have been collected as a percentage of the full scores earned by each student. The CL score is defined as the percentage of the students who have achieved a 70% raw score or higher. These CL scores were then compared against the satisfactory level. For assessment instruments including exam/quiz/assignment/course project, we use the following criterion: a learning outcome is deemed satisfactory when 70% of students scored over 70% on the outcome. The exception is with placement, where we report self-reported employment statistics for the program.

The attached CL data file provides the raw data collected on each of the CLs from Spring 2012 to Fall 2016, as well as the calculated final scores on each CL for each year.

The attached SLO summary file reports on all the SLO scores for each year covered in the assessment period, computed as the average of the corresponding constituent CLs, along with the indirect assessment of the overall program outcome, percentage of graduates who have obtained employment within 6 months of degree completion.

 

Ph.D. MIS : Assessment Activities

Doctoral learning outcomes will be measured during the core exam (taken by Ph.D. students at the end of their first year), the written preliminary exam (typically at the end of second year), oral comprehensive exam, dissertation and course teaching (TCE performance).

The core exam will be used to measure students' knowledge of the field. Performance will be considered satsifactory if students score 70% or higher in each exam component. This outcome will also be measured in the oral comprehensive exam. The outcomes related to research (analyzing research) written prelim, oral comprehensive exam. The attached rubrics provide more detail on the evaluation of the research-related outcomes. The outcome of effectively delivering course content will be measured by considering the TCE score of students (a score of 3.5 or higher will be considered satisfactory).

Assessment Findings: 

MS MIS : Assessment Findings

The following table summarizes our key findings. Data is provided in decimal form and represents the proportion of students meeting the Student Learning Outcome (SLO).

SLO

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

SLO1

0.98

1

1

1

0.97

SLO2

0.83

0.84

0.87

0.87

0.94

SLO3

0.97

N/A

1

1

1

SLO4

0.94

0.91

0.89

0.97

0.97

SLO5

0.99

0.97

0.99

0.94

0.98

SLO6

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

 

Program level measure

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Job placement within 6 months

1.00

0.97

0.99

1.00

Not yet available

 

We make the following observations. In general, for SLO1-SLO5, as measured by the SLO scores, the MS MIS program has been consistently performing in a satisfactory manner. We also note that the job placement numbers have been excellent in the past years. As for SLO6, which is concerned with effectiveness of communications, the informal feedback from the company clients has indicated that the MS MIS students have been doing quite well. The estimated effectiveness score is around 0.90 consistently over the past five years. Collecting individual student performance data on SLO6 is viewed by the department as a priority item for the next assessment cycle.

 

 

Ph.D. MIS: Assessment Findings

We began data collection in Summer of 2014. The data below represent assessments during calendar year 2014, 2015 and 2016. Note that criteria are satisfied when 70% of the students achieve the expected level. This may seem like a low number, but in any given year, with 4 or fewer students, one student missing the mark will get us to 75% rapidly.

SLO

Source of Assessment

Satisfied: 2014?

Satisfied: 2015? Satisfied: 2016?

SLO1: Demonstrate broad knowledge of the field of MIS

Core Exam: Pass questions with a score of 70% or higher

 

Oral Comprehensive Exam
(Rubric 1): Overall score of 3.5/5.0

Yes (75.5%)

 

 

Yes (93.7%)

Yes (71.4%)

 

 

Yes (100%)

Yes (100%)

 

 

Yes (100%)

SLO2: Critically analyze published research results in his/her area of study

Written Prelim
(Rubric 3): Overall score of  “competent”

 

Dissertation
(Rubric 2): Overall score of 4.0/5.0

Yes (100%)

 

 

Yes (100%)

Yes (100%)

 

 

Yes (100%)

Yes (100%)

 

 

Yes (100%)

SLO3: Conduct original research on a significant MIS problem

Written Prelim
(Rubric 3): Overall score of competent

 

Dissertation
(Rubric 2): Overall scores of 4.0/5.0

Yes (100%)

 

 

Yes (100%)

Yes (100%)

 

 

Yes (100%)

Yes (100%)

 

 

Yes (100%)

 

SLO4: Effectively communicate and defend results of research to peers and broader scientific audiences

Written Prelim
(Rubric 3): Overall score of ‘competent”

 

Dissertation
(Rubric 2): Overall score of 4.0/5.0

Yes (100%)

 

 

Yes (100%)

 

Yes (100%)

 

 

Yes (100%)

 

Yes (100%)

 

 

Yes (100%)

 

SLO5: Deliver course content effectively and demonstrate impact on student learning

TCE Question 1 (amount learned): Overall score of 3.8/5.0 or higher

 

TCE Question 4
(effectiveness): Overall scores of 4.0/5.0 or higher

Yes (80%)

 

 

Yes (73%)

 

No (50%)

 

 

Yes (75%)

 

No (40%)

 

 

Yes (80%)

 

 

 

Findings

The findings provide evidence that students are learning the appropriate knowledge in MIS and their minor discipline(s). Although our numbers were small for written prelims and dissertations, the evidence does show that students are able to demonstrate that they can successfully perform independent research. We had 14 students teach courses in 2014, 16 teach in 2015, and 15 teach in 2016. Their overall averages on the TCEs were very good. Those who were below the target scores have been counseled regarding their performance and encouraged to take advantage of additional opportunities to receive additional training through online and university-sponsored seminars, faculty mentoring, and through teaching another course.

 

Change in Response to Findings: 

MS MIS : Changes in Response to Assessment Findings

We have been systematically collecting data on learning outcomes across the MS MIS core courses. Using 70% as the threshold, all program-level SLOs have been deemed satisfactory. Should a pattern be detected of outcomes not being met, it will trigger a review of these outcomes by the MIS MS committee. This committee may wish to examine whether courses sufficiently addressed an outcome, or if students need additional training in learning areas. If the outcome itself is in need of revision or change, the committee will determine the revised or new outcome.

In addition to the program-level SLOs, we have also been closely monitoring the course-level CLs. For instance, in the case of MIS531, based on the assessment data, while student learning outcomes were satisfied, a drop was noticed in student performance during 2013-2014. The drop provided an input for focus during 2015 and there was an improvement seen in the following year’s result. Students were encouraged to follow pre-course training recommendations to improve base skills, and additional course topic emphases were provided.

Measuring student performance on learning outcomes allows us to see if our students are performing at the level expected of a top-tier program. If students have been consistently meeting learning outcome standards over a period of time, then the graduate committee will also consider whether raising the expectations for students (as measured by a “satisfactory” learning outcome) is opportune. Assessment findings are also expected to provide us with a measure of student learning that can be compared with best practices in MIS, and if necessary a yardstick to compare against peer institutions.

The MIS MS committee will be reviewing student learning outcomes on a yearly basis, to examine their currency and usefulness. The committee will also to review data collection for each measure. This will ensure that the curriculum stays current with the changing needs of the field of Information Systems.

 

 

Ph.D. MIS : Changes in Response to Assessment Findings

The assessment for SLO1 is an exam that the department has continually updated. We believe it assesses students’ first year learning and represents well their level of knowledge attainment. The PhD committee reviewed the assessments and related rubrics for SLOs 2-4.  They seem to be giving us a good picture of the students’ writing abilities. The primary concerns are with respect to SLO5. The MIS Department does not have a formal course in teaching. We do, however, encourage students to pursue the University teaching certificate. In the coming year, the committee will review the TCE scores in light of other instructors’ scores for that same course to see if the “Amount Learned” scores are in sync with the other instructors. Likewise, the committee will review to see if there is a relationship between a course and the “effectiveness” scores, and/or a relationship between the scores and whether or not a student received the University teaching certificate.

 

The PhD committee continues to review student learning outcomes once a year, to examine their currency and usefulness. The committee also reviews data collection for each measure. This ensures that the curriculum stays current with the changing needs of the Information Systems field and the assessments provide useful information for the program. 

Updated date: Sun, 06/11/2017 - 17:21