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Nursing: Graduate Programs

Overview: 

The College of Nursing offers multiple graduate (Masters, DNP, and PhD) programs:

Master of Science for Entry to the Profession of Nursing (MEPN)

The Master of Science for Entry to the Profession of Nursing (MEPN) is a 15-month, full-time program with a highly demanding schedule. Coursework begins in May and ends in August of the following year.  Students are strongly advised to avoid working while in the program as the coursework and clinical rotations often require more than 40 hours per week to complete. Students graduate with a Master of Science: Entry to the Profession of Nursing degree and become eligible to take the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX) to become a Registered Nurse.

Program options are available in both Phoenix and TucsonPhoenix cohorts take courses at the Phoenix Biomedical Campus, located at 7th Street and Van Buren in Phoenix, AZ, and clinical rotations are completed in the surrounding Phoenix-metro area.

Master of Science in Clinical Systems Leadership (RN-MSN)
(online program)

The Master of Science in Nursing Clinical Systems Leadership (RN-MSN) online program features two distinct, accelerated paths that recognize nurses’ previous academic accomplishments and years of working experience:

  • RNs with an Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) complete a 44-credit, 24-month curriculum.
     
  • RNs with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) complete a 31-credit, 15-month curriculum.

Both tracks allow nurses to earn their degree in less time than traditional MSN or RN bridge programs, empowering them with the clinical leadership skills to help re-shape patient care at the system level immediately. There are three starts per year – January, May and September – and the program does not require any residencies or travel to campus.

State Authorization

Changes to the Higher Education Act (HEA) require The University of Arizona and the College of Nursing to comply with individual state/jurisdiction authorizations of distance education programs. As the Master of Science in Nursing Clinical Systems Leadership (RN-MSN) program is 100 percent online, most states are authorized or exempt from authorization. The College of Nursing can only admit students from authorized, exempt and in progress jurisdictions at this time. As of 6/2/2015 the following authorizations are in place: RN-MSN State Authorization Map.

For information concerning The University of Arizona’s compliance with these regulations students may contact the Outreach College or visit the State Authorization webpage.

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)
(online program)

The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) is similar to other practice doctorates such as the MD, JD and PharmD. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing has designated the DNP as the terminal nursing practice degree.

Students may enter the DNP as a post-Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) student or a post-master’s (nursing) student. Part-time and full-time options are available. (Nurse anesthetist students must attend full-time.)

  • The BSN-DNP curriculum is a 74-89 credits depending upon the practice specialty selected.
  • The MS (Nursing)-DNP curriculum to become a nurse practitioner (NP) is 71-74 credits depending upon the practice specialty selected. Most students will be able to transfer coursework to reduce the total number of credits needed to complete degree requirements.  The MS-DNP curriculum for those who already are NPs or CRNAs is a 43-credit program.

Doctor of Nursing Practice Specialties

State Authorization

Changes to the Higher Education Act (HEA) require The University of Arizona and the College of Nursing to comply with individual state/jurisdiction authorizations of distance education programs. As the Doctor of Nursing Practice programs require the student to have a physical presence to conduct clinical practica, additional requirements must be met. The College of Nursing can only admit students from authorized jurisdictions at this time. The following authorizations are in currently in place: DNP State Authorization Map.

For information concerning The University of Arizona’s compliance with these regulations students may contact the Outreach College or visit the State Authorization webpage.

Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing (PhD)
(online program)

The Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing (PhD) focuses on research in a clinical, academic or scientific environment. There are several pathways to the PhD:

  • BSN-PhD - 79 credits
  • MS-PhD - 64 credits
  • DNP-PhD

Part-time and full-time options are available. Full-time study requires a minimum of 9 credits per semester. The PhD program coursework is completed fully-online. Students are required to attend a mandatory, on-campus, one-week orientation known as the Resident Intensive Summer Experience (RISE) each year. RISE attendance for part-time students may vary. RISE typically occurs the week prior to the fall semester, in August of each year.

Coursework in nursing and other sciences are emphasized during the early portion of an individualized program of study. Then, time is increasingly devoted to research conducted under the supervision of a faculty researcher and mentor.

Our Areas of Research Excellence are:

  • Biobehavioral Neuroscience
  • Health Disparities and Illness Self-Management
  • Population Health & Wellness: Health Promotion, Systems and Informatics

DNP/PhD Dual Degrees

Students who are interested in attaining broader research skills for application to clinical practice, may take advantage of the dual Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degrees. The DNP/PhD Dual Degrees option is available upon admission to one of the doctoral programs. Dual degree students must satisfy both DNP and PhD posted admission and enrollment requirements.

Accreditation and Affiliations

The University of Arizona College of Nursing is nationally accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, approved by the Arizona State Board of Nursing, and affiliated with the American Association of Colleges of Nursing  and the Western Institute of Nursing

   

 

Expected Learning Outcomes: 

General Outcomes for Masters of Science in Nursing

Outcomes for the PhD program

  • Generate and disseminate knowledge to advance nursing science and facilitate its translation into practice
  • Design and evaluate innovations to improve health outcomes
  • Engage in and lead collaborative research teams
  • Influence health science agenda-setting and policy initiatives
Outcomes for the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program
 
Upon completion of the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program, the graduate will be able to:
 
·      Generate and disseminate nursing practice knowledge to stimulate research and improve clinical outcomes.
·      Improve health outcomes through scientifically-based advanced practice within a specialty.
·      Engage in and lead collaborative practice teams.
·      Influence clinical practice transformation and policy initiatives.

 

 

Assessment Activities: 

Regular or Recurring Activities

Last Modified: 01/21/2005

Updated date: Wed, 12/07/2016 - 11:56