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BS- Criminal Justice Studies

Overview: 
Bachelors of Science in Criminal Justice Studies
 
The Criminal Justice Studies major introduces students to the fundamental foundations of criminal justice spanning from crime initiation to systems of punishment. Students will have the opportunity to take an in-depth look at mental health law, juvenile justice systems, police, court and corrections management and operations as well as a host of other options. In addition, students will be exposed to traditional public administration courses that impart core skill sets such as leadership, ethics, public and nonprofit management, and formation of public policy.
 
Upon receipt of their degree students will be prepared to think critically in an increasingly complex and politicized society. Criminal Justice majors qualify for many different careers in public sector organizations, including, but not limited to, careers in law enforcement, national security, and local, state, and federal government. Many of our graduates have sought and attained positions in local law enforcement, DEA, FBI, ICE, and Border Patrol. Students graduating with criminal justice degrees can go onto attain advanced degrees in Law, Public Administration, Public Policy, Sociology, Social Work and many other related fields.
 
This major is sponsored and financially supported by the Rombach Institute of Crime, Delinquency and Corrections. The Institute has had a presence on campus since its founding in 1997. The mission of the Rombach Institute is to advance the knowledge, pursuit and evaluation of significant public policy issues as they relate to the field of criminal justice. The Institute provides student financial support; funding for public policy research, publications and conferences; support for state criminal justice officials to coordinate evaluations, analysis and training; host guest speakers and public forums; and student and faculty awards and fellowships. The main focus of the Institute in the future will be to provide students with a well-rounded experience that evolves with the field of criminal justice practice.
 
Expected Learning Outcomes: 
Upon graduation, the Criminal Justice majors are expected to: 
 
• Demonstrate a basic understanding of the American criminal justice system from the creation of laws to their application by police, courts and corrections.  
• Demonstrate research, writing and comprehension skills relevant to the field of criminal justice.
• Recognize the intersection between criminal justice practice and political processes and institutions.  Public policies provide the framework for interaction in society but it is the culture of the community and the prevailing political and economic institutions that often dictate how criminal justice systems operate.  Students should comprehend that no institution is independent.
• Be conversant in the foundational concepts, practices, theories, and methodologies used in the study of (their chosen field within) criminal justice.
• Demonstrate critical thinking about criminal justice issues through an assessment of the competing arguments and applying the available evidence to differentiate ethical and effective outcomes from those that favor one person, party or position.  The student should display proficiency with communicating their arguments in oral and/or written format. 
 
Assessment Activities: 

 

Map of Criminal Justice Administration  Undergraduate Degree Courses to Student Learning Outcomes

Courses in the Major

Assessment Activities

Student Learning Outcomes

LO 1

LO 2

LO 3

LO 4

LO 5

PA 206

Quiz (Pre)

1

1

1

1

 

PA 241

 

Quiz (Post)

2

2

2

2

 

PA 343, 344, 406, 470

Writing Assignment

2

2

2

2

3

PA 435, 336, 347, 443

Oral Presentations

2

2

2

3

3

PA 337, 340, 345, 347, 419

Writing Assignment

2

2

2

2

2

PA 411, 443, 445

Writing Assignment

 3

3

3

3

3

PA 331, 441, 446

Writing Assignment

3

3

3

3

3

 

*The numerals 1, 2, and 3 within the table indicate the level at which the outcomes are addressed in each course: 1 indicates a lower-level, 2 indicates a moderate-level, and 3 indicates a higher level to which that particular Learning Outcome is addressed

 

Updated date: Tue, 08/15/2017 - 11:40