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Intelligence Studies - Unique Program

Overview: 
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The Bachelors of Applied Science Degree in Intelligence Studies is for students seeking a career in an intelligence-related career path. The degree serves students who have earned an Applied Associates Degree, civilians working with defense contractors and active-duty military personnel. Topics covered in the intelligence degree emphasize the historical and political context of the intelligence field and provide students with a deeper social and cultural understanding of world regions critical to U.S. national and international intelligence communities.


 

Expected Learning Outcomes: 

1. Identify key events, persons, successes, and failures in the history of intelligence.

2. Describe the organizational structures, resources, capabilities, and responsibilities of intelligence institutions.

3. Evaluate the use of the "Intelligence Cycle” as a framework for understanding intelligence activities.

4. Compare the processes for collecting, processing and exploiting information used in Human Intelligence (HUMINT), Signals Intelligence (SIGINT), Geospatial Intelligence (GEOINT), and Measurement and Signature Intelligence (MASINT).

5. Describe the issues and challenges in coordinating intelligence collection from multiple sources.

6. Demonstrate understanding of the processes whereby data are analyzed to produce valid and reliable intelligence products for strategic, operational, and tactical consumers.

7. Employ basic qualitative and quantitative analysis procedures to test hypotheses and develop valid analytic findings.

8. Differentiate between counterintelligence, counterespionage, and counterterrorism, and analyze operational security measures appropriate to each.

9. Identify appropriate general security measures (physical, personnel, information, cyber, investigations and security management) to variable threats.

10. Demonstrate critical thinking strategies including reasoning, problem solving, analysis and evaluation through written and oral reports.

11. Apply intelligence knowledge, skills and abilities through an internship, capstone, practicum, or supervised research experience.

Assessment Activities: 

The following is an assessment plan and proposed rubric for writing:

1. GPSV 314—National Security Policy is the gateway course for the BAS in Intelligence Studies. Students will take a Pre-survey at the start of this course that asks students to rate their prior knowledge of the content contained in Program Student Learning Outcomes 1-9. This is an indirect measure, but will nevertheless reveal useful information about the initial preparedness of students for the Intelligence Studies program and offer a baseline from which to judge how well the Intelligence Studies program meets the objectives articulated in the Program Student Learning Outcomes for students who complete the program.

2. All required courses in the BAS in Intelligence Studies include a major writing assignment that is assessed according to the standard program analytic rubric (attached) through D2L. Assessment data collected through the application of this rubric will be analyzed on an ongoing basis.

3. GPSV 498—Senior Capstone in Intelligence Studies and GPSV 450—Special Topics in Regional Politics and Security: these courses provide students with comprehensive and cumulative research projects/papers that assess whether students have acquired the central knowledge and skills that comprise the eleven Student Learning Outcomes expected of the Intelligence Studies program. Student mastery of these outcomes will be assessed through an evaluation of the final research project/paper according to the standard program analytic rubric (attached) through D2L. Assessment data collected through the application of this rubric to Senior Capstone Research Papers will be analyzed on an ongoing basis.

4. Students in GPSV 498 or GPSV 450 will take a program Post-survey that asks them to rate the knowledge, skills, and abilities contained in the Program Student Learning Outcomes that they have acquired as a result of completing the Intelligence Studies Program. Students will also be asked whether learning outcomes for the program were clear; whether course content and materials, activities, assignments, and tests in their classes contributed to meeting the student learning outcomes of the Intelligence Studies program. Finally, students will be asked what are the three most important things they learned in the Intelligence Studies Program. This information will be compiled and analyzed against the Pre-survey data.

 

Standard Writing Assignment Rubric for Required Courses in Intelligence Studies

 

 

48-50 points

Content:  Your paper contains important, relevant, and/or interesting arguments about the assigned topic.  You offer an opinion, which you support with facts, research, and compelling theoretical discussions. You make excellent use of the assigned readings and other sources to support your arguments and opinions.

43-47 points

Content: Your paper contains many important points and you answer most aspects of the question.  You refer to the assigned readings and to other sources to support most of your arguments and opinions. Your conclusion relies to some extent upon your subjective feelings rather than strong support from facts, evidence, and analysis.

40-42 points

Content:  Your paper does address some important elements of the topic and you answer some aspects of the question.  You should refer more often to the assigned readings and to other sources to provide evidence and support for some of your arguments and opinions. Your conclusion relies too much upon your subjective feelings rather than strong support from facts, evidence, and analysis.

35-39 points

Content: The content of your paper offers mostly superficial treatment of the topic and you do not address most aspects of the question. Your analysis is often superficial and your arguments are not well supported with facts or evidence from the assigned readings or other sources. 

It is appropriate to offer an opinion, but your opinion must be supported by facts, evidence, and analysis and not be based upon your subjective feelings.

24-25 points

Organization: Your paper contains a well-written introduction, a body, and a conclusion.  Your arguments follow logically within paragraphs and throughout the paper.  Your conclusion is supported by the arguments and evidence you offer in the body of the paper. You explain in a logical and compelling manner why you have come to this particular conclusion.

22-23 points

Organization: Your paper provides a clear introduction, body, and conclusion, There are places where the context of your arguments is not made clear, but most of your arguments follow logically from one another. You explain why you have come to this particular conclusion, but could offer a deeper analysis to support your thesis. 

20-21 points

Organization: Your paper contains a basic introduction, body, and conclusion, There are places where the context of your arguments is not made clear, but most of your arguments follow logically from one another. You explain why you have come to this particular conclusion, but could offer a deeper analysis.

17-20 points

Organization:  Your paper is lacking some of the important elements of organization, such as a basic introduction, body, and conclusion, There are numerous places where the context of your arguments is not made clear. Many of your arguments do not follow logically from one another, and are not well-supported with evidence.

24-25 points

Conventions:  Your paper is well-written and is free of grammatical, spelling, punctuation, and all typographical errors.  It displays excellent sentence fluency and appropriate word choice.

22-23 points

Conventions:  Your paper is generally free of grammatical, spelling, punctuation, and typographical errors. It displays basic sentence fluency and word choice. There are mistakes, but they generally do not detract from the substance of your paper.

20-21 points

Conventions:  Your paper has a number of grammatical, spelling, punctuation, and typographical errors. There are deficiencies in basic sentence fluency and word choice. Sometimes the errors are sufficiently numerous to detract from the substance of your paper.

17-20 points

Conventions:  Your paper contains excessive of grammatical, spelling, punctuation, and typographical errors.   It lacks sentence fluency and appropriate word choice. The excessive mistakes detract from the substance of your paper.

 

Updated date: Thu, 04/27/2017 - 13:55